Certificates in Criminal Justice and Why You Should Get One

Certificates in general give you a fast and quick way to get into any profession or help you specialize in your current profession. You can get a certificate in the numerous criminal justice professions.

There are two types of certificate one can get. One is an entry level certificate. This certificate allows you to get entry level positions in your profession. The other certificate is a professional certificate. This certificate is for those already in a profession that want to specialize in certain area of the profession. This is more like continuing education for the professional. The easiest way to explain this is through the examples presented below.

One example is someone who gets an entry level certificate in paralegal studies. This certificate allows you to get entry level job as a legal assistant in law firms or law department of organizations.

On the other hand, a professional in the criminal justice field can get a certificate in paralegal studies. This certificate is a form of professional studies that helps keep them current in the profession. It also helps him or her get more specialized training as paralegal. The hope is that such specialization will help in career advancement.

Another example is someone who gets an entry level certificate in law enforcement. This certificate will enable the person get entry level position in police departments or other law enforcement organizations.

On the other hand, a law enforcement professional can get a certificate to help him or her specialize in an area of law enforcement. It could a certificate that helps him or her perform better as an investigator. This type of law enforcement certificate will strictly focus on investigative skills. The person doing this is again hoping this certificate will help their career advancement.

A final example is an entry level certificate in homeland security. This person will acquire the skills to handle basic homeland security duties. The person will be employed by local, state, or federal homeland security organizations.

On the other hand, a homeland security specialist can get certificate in homeland security that helps him or her perform their job better. This type of certificate could be in the area of counter terrorism. This will keep them in the cutting edge of counter terrorism and help him or her stay ahead of terrorists. Again, the idea here is to keep them relevant in the profession, with the hope that this relevancy will help their career advancement.

Any way you look at it, a certificate in criminal justice can only help the individual that acquires it. An entry level one helps one get a job and a foot in the door of the profession. This foot in the door leads to paychecks. A professional certificate helps one specialize. This specialization leads to career advancement and more money.

I have only given a few examples of certificates in criminal justice. There are a lot more. Covering all of them is beyond what I can do in this short article. If you are interested in seeing more examples, I urge you to do more reading on it. You can do this by visiting websites that deal with the subject in more detail.

Note: You are free to reprint or republish this article. The only condition is that the Resource Box should be included and the links are live links.

Futility in Criminal Justice and Prison Reform

Many issues confront criminal justice and prison reformers, some of them relatively futile. Today, reform-minded people are appalled at the racial and wealth disparities at each juncture leading to the end result of incarceration. The fate of convicted felons is a New Jim Crow regime, a pariah class, wherein convicted felons and their families are disadvantaged for the rest of their lives. The driver of the New Jim Crow is often considered institutional racism, racism working within a supposedly colorblind society. Institutional racism is tough to identify with precision.

The nature of our criminal justice system defies attempts to abolish group outcomes. Offenders are judged as individuals, not as a group. Each individual stands on their own case. Thus, it is very difficult to change the composition of an entire large group when each individual was selected for inclusion based upon individual circumstances, behavior, prosecution, evidence, crime, laws, defense, prosecutor, plea bargain, jury, judge, correctional decision and appeal.

Efforts to eliminate the huge racial disparities in America’s prison population are futile in other ways. How much effort should we exert to make fair a punishment method that doesn’t work? Recidivism and crime rates usually prove the ineffectiveness of incarceration, especially now that most prisoners do not perform hard labor. Making incarceration racially non-discriminatory does not change the negative outcomes for those sent to prison or we who pay the massive expenses and social costs. Sending people to prison harms society and the prisoners themselves. We will never succeed by making a failed system of correction “fair.” Failed systems are inherently unfair.

An issue exists concerning the privatization of prisons. This merely debates whether the isolating and warehousing functions of prison should be carried on by private or public means. The experience of the prisoner is relatively unaffected. Much less interest is shown in the privatization that would make a difference: hard labor for private employers. A debate over how to fail is not productive.

The length of prison sentences is open to debate, too. Studies show that increasing the length of prison sentences has relatively little deterrent value. Longer sentences generally equate to worse personal outcomes for offenders. How much failure is enough?

Solitary confinement is debated because it is known to produce prisoner insanity, but correctional officials need this sanction for security reasons, to protect vulnerable prisoners and punish misbehaving prisoners. Isolating offenders from schools, jobs, marriages, families, communities and religious groups usually harms the offender and those left behind. This isolation starts the first time a student is suspended or expelled from school. How much destructive isolation is warranted?

Progressive prison reformers 100 years ago wrote that to be successful, prisons must be self-sustaining with the hard labor of prisoners. Governments today create detention and incarceration systems, eventually learn of their failures, but then do not want to invest in successful outcomes or readily institute the changes necessary to thoroughly reform prisons. This political and social dynamic is not likely to change given the power of law-abiding society and the weakness of prisoners. Changes must make things better for law-abiding people.

The ultimate destiny of many offenders can best be provided with means other than incarceration as we now know it. True incorrigibles need to stay in prison and be put to work… or executed. Debates that do not help change the ultimate experience of punishment are doomed to some measure of futility. Although our society has gradually eliminated outcomes other than incarceration, abandoned methods must now be brought out of retirement, tested, improved and instituted in place of our failed social experiment of locking people up in cages and letting them sit idle most of the time. Methods that deserve another look include hard labor, judicial corporal punishment and the wearing of metallic collars, with or without electronic enhancements.

Criminal Justice Training

Find Criminal Justice Training Programs in the United States and Canada. Criminal justice training is provided at most academic schools and colleges throughout the nation. Modern criminal justice training courses instruct prospective law enforcement candidates in the challenging career path of the criminal justice system. Focusing primarily on the functions of law enforcement, prosecution, trail, and corrections — criminal justice training can lead successful graduates to rewarding and honorable career fields.

When enrolled in a criminal justice training program, individuals acquire education in public safety, juvenile justice, prosecution, victim assistance, law enforcement, crime prevention, loss prevention, corrections, court administration and trial processes; among other subject matter.

Depending on the primary focus of education in a criminal justice training course, there are a variety of occupational options which one can pursue. For example, a number of criminal justice training programs may emphasize corrections and rehabilitation.

Just like many other law enforcement courses, this particular program of study will encompass legal issues and laws (both state and federal) surrounding the respective department of corrections and rehabilitation. In addition, students receive hands-on training in physical defense tactics, supervision of inmates in a correctional setting, effective communication skills, report writing, and other essential instruction.

If you’re drawn to social work, a criminal justice training program would be beneficial in helping you to acquire employment in a variety of local, state and federal government settings. Probation officers, for instance, work closely with local law enforcement agencies, as well as correctional institutions and often require education from a criminal justice training program to be fully prepared to fulfill the duties of this line of work.

Currently, criminal justice training can lead to degrees and/or certification; and may be attained through accredited universities, academies, tech schools and even online courses.

To learn more about criminal justice training, or if you are interested in entering other fields of law enforcement, feel free to search our vocational schools directory.

Find your dream job! Let education within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, cosmetology, acupuncture, healthcare, personal training, and others get you started! Explore career school programs near you.

Criminal Justice Training
┬ęCopyright 2007
The CollegeBound Network
All Rights Reserved

NOTICE: Article(s) may be republished free of charge to relevant websites, as long as Copyright and Author Resource Box are included; and ALL Hyperlinks REMAIN intact and active.

Criminal Justice – Why Study Anti-Social Behaviour?

In the UK, “anti-social behaviour” and “ASBOs” (Anti-Social Behaviour Orders) have increasingly become crime-related buzzwords over the last ten years. This has been a consequence of the Labour government’s introduction of a civil order as punishment for those who are disorderly (i.e. ranging from being a noisy neighbour to being verbally abusive), this prevents the individual from going to certain places and talking to certain people after it is issued.

Subsequently, Anti-Social Behaviour is increasingly becoming a subject studied on criminal justice courses, and a module in its own right. So why should one consider studying Anti-Social Behaviour? And what can we expect from such a course or module?

One of the reasons the phrases: “anti-social behaviour” and “ASBO” have become such popular terms is a result of the significant amount of criticism that mounted via the public and media over the last 10 years. This, of course, is one of the reasons the subject is so ripe for debate in the classroom. After all, is the zealous hand-out of a civil order really making a difference on crime? Or can they actually make our streets safer? And how about those who have received them for such, seemingly, lawful acts as playing football?

Such questions are frequent at the inception of any new government attempt to drive down crime, yet anti-social behaviour orders have also been the stimulus for an intriguing trend within certain communities – further highlighting their futility. After their introduction, it soon became clear that ASBOs were becoming something of a ‘badge of honour’ to some people, or as Elizabeth Burney argues in ‘Talking Tough, Acting Coy’, an “emblem of punitive populism”. Such trends are of great interest to those with an interest in criminal justice – due both to the development of social response to law on a community and national level, as well as arguable failure of such orders.

Expectedly, a module or course with a focus on anti-social behaviour will spend some study time on discussing how ASBOs are issued, and what type of actions an individual has to do to deserve one – an aspect of the subject that seems to differ from area to area. Such debate has been borne from the diversity of reasons given by courts for issuing ASBOs, i.e. more intriguing reasons have included flyposting, suicide attempts, and even kicking a football over a fence. Discussion on the reasons for ASBOs and the reasons for they way the work to be re-addressed are, therefore, perfect for those with an interest in law and criminal justice to formulate opinions on a very relevant and “close-to-home” issue.

Additionally, anti-social behaviour modules and courses also study the impact of civil orders on safety and crime in communities from different areas (i.e. urban and rural), as well as on a national level – and question the methods and the necessity for them. This, I would say, is one of the most fundamental aspects of studying anti-social behaviour – it is a direct insight into the complexities of crime and law on a multitude of levels: the individual, the family, the community, the region, and the country. And it is an aspect of criminal justice that is set to change significantly over the next few years.

Top 10 Online Criminal Justice Schools

If you are planning to pursue a career in criminal justice, you will firstly need to obtain a degree specializing in criminal justice. While you are enrolled in such program, you will learn about the legal system in the US, methods for deterring crime, philosophy of punishment; and the code of ethics for criminal justice professionals, among areas of study. With the correct training, graduates can gain employment in law enforcement agencies, court administrative departments, victim service centers, and correctional facilities. Here is a list of the top 10 online schools that offer criminal justice programs:

1. Colorado Technical University Online

Such degrees are available at the Colorado Technical University Online and include Associate Degree and Bachelor’s Degree, as well as a Master’s Degree in management with specialization in criminal justice. Topics covered in the courses include law and courts, investigation and law enforcement, parole and juvenile justice, home security and public administration.

2. Everest University Online

Everest University Online has two kinds of criminal science degrees, namely, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Applied Science. The Bachelor of Applied Science degree gives the necessary training for students to secure employment in the field of security and corrections. Those who want to assume middle or higher level positions in environments immediately after graduation should opt for the Bachelor of Science degree.

3. Keiser University eCampus

Keiser University eCampus offers Associate, Bachelor’s, and Master’s degrees in criminal justice. Students who study this subject in this school will gain a better understanding of the basics, as well as street ‘gangsterism’, victim-logy, forensic psychology, drug control, and others. They will benefit greatly from personalized attention and career placement services.

4. University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix has a wide selection of degrees for criminal justice students, including Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Science. Courses are primarily designed to prepare students for positions in security-related fields. Students can also learn how to start their own firms while attending the programs in this school.

5. Columbia Southern University

At the Columbia Southern University, the students can pursue an Associate Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, or Master’s Degree. Degree programs at Columbia Sothern are specifically designed to enable adult students to juggle education and family. All online classes are conducted by live professors.

6. American Intercontinental University Online

American Intercontinental University Online offers a flexible curriculum that enables you to complete your degree at your own pace. It is an accredited university that is respected by many employers. The degrees that are available at AIU Online include Associate Degree and Bachelor’s Degree in this particular field.

7. Ashford University Online

This online university offers Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice. Its program focuses on forensics, psychology, and other areas that are relating criminal justice. Students can complete the program in one or two years depending on their personal circumstances and abilities.

8. Argosy University Online

Argosy University Online has two types of criminal justice degrees, namely, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Science. Its personalized service, experienced faculty, and supportive community provide a most effective learning environment for students.

9. Kaplan University

Kaplan University offers a convenient way for students to obtain an Associate Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, or Master’s Degree. It has an extensive selection of programs, ranging from forensic psychology to computer crime.

10. Virginia College Online

Criminal justice students in Virginia College Online can obtain an Associate Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, or Master’s Degree. This school is an accredited institution, and its degrees are accepted by most employers of criminal justice professionals.

The best online school for you will be the one which not only covers the areas of criminal justice that you are most interested in, but will also provide a learning schedule that you can easily slot in around your personal commitments. Before enrolling in any online school, always research into each aspect of the course, the entry requirements and how that particular degree will enable you to take the next step into your career.